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George "Doc" Medich

Baseball ∙ Hopewell

 

 

 

 

George Medich got his nickname from his long association with the medical profession, but he is one of those rare athletes who was able to blend sports into his eventual lifetime career. He was a three sport star at Hopewell High School in basketball, football, and baseball, but he gained most of his fame as a pitcher. He led the Vikings baseball team to an 8-1 record in 1965, but they lost to New Brighton in playoff action. At the University of Pittsburgh, Doc was the Panthers’ punter and starting end on the football team for three seasons. In 1967 he had 23 pass receptions for 269 yards to rank third on the team. He also kept his hand in as a 6'-5" 225 pound power pitcher for the Panthers, consistently ranking as one of the top collegiate hurlers in the East. He was drafted by the Yankees in 1970 and was called up to the major leagues after two seasons in the minors. Doc chalked up his first major league victory by helping the Yanks down Milwaukee, 5-2, in 1973. During his much traveled major league career, Doc pitched for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1976 after being traded by the Yankees for Willie Randolph and others. He beat the Mets, 3-1, in his first start for the Pirates and finished the season with an 8-10 record and a 3.52 ERA. Doc also pitched for the Oakland A’s, Texas Rangers, and Milwaukee Brewers. He appeared in one game for the Brewers in the 1982 World Series that they lost to the St Louis Cardinals. After compiling a lifetime pitching record of 124-105, Doc retired from baseball to devote himself to his career as an orthopedic surgeon and was associated with Dr Mickey Zernich in a practice that specialized in sports medicine.